SHRIRAM SPARK

THINK DIFFERENT

Month: April 2013

SOLAR DISH – 2000 TIMES STRONGER THAN A NORMAL SOLAR CELL

SOLAR DISH - 2000 TIMES STRONGER THAN A NORMAL SOLAR CELL

It seems like everyone and their uncle is working on a better way to get more energy out of photovoltaic solar cells, from using quantum dots to fiber optics. Now a Swiss company has decided on a brute-force method: hit a photovoltaic cell with the equivalent of 2,000 suns.

Airlight Energy, partnering with IBM Research, ETH Zurich, and Switzerland’s Interstate University of Applied Sciences, is developing a way to use parabolic reflectors to concentrate sunlight onto a set of solar cells, each only a half inch on a side.

It’s called a High Concentration PhotoVoltaic Thermal (HCPVT) system and so far, the test plant is capable of generating 25 kiloWatts of electricity.

The parabolic dish tracks the sun as it moves across the sky, so it always gets the maximum amount of light. As a result, the solar cell chips receive 2,000 times as much light energy as they normally would. Even though they’re small, each cell pumps out up to 250 Watts, and there are hundreds of them.

Photovoltaic panels, though, start losing their efficiency if they get too hot — to say nothing of melting. To keep the chips cool, a network of tiny tubes carries water between and around them. The water reaches temperatures of about 194 degrees, which can be used to heat water in a building or to heat salty water, which is passed through a membrane that removes the salt to make the water drinkable.

The photovoltaic plant operates at 30 percent efficiency, much higher than the less than 20 percent one might expect from a typical roof-mounted setup. And a parabolic dish of about one square yard would be able to generate about two kilowatt-hours per day and purify seven to nine gallons of salt water.

Right now there are several prototypes being built, with one being tested in Switzerland. Airlight said in a press release that they envision this kind of solar power in countries where there’s lots of sun but little fresh water.

HOW THE NE-555 TIMER IC WORKS

The 555 is a single-chip version of a commonly used circuit called a multivibrator, which is useful in a wide variety of electronic circuits. The 555 timer chipis probably the most popular integrated circuit ever made.

You can use the 555 chips for basic timing functions, such as turning a light on for a certain length of time, or you can use it to create a warning light that flashes on and off. You can use it to produce musical notes of a particular frequency, or you can use it to control positioning of a servo device.

Here is the arrangement of the eight pins in a standard 555 IC. The 555 comes in an 8-pin DIP package.

 

 

7 Continue reading

ROBONAUT2, THE NEXT GENERATION DEXTEROUS ROBOT

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Robonaut2 surpasses previous dexterous humanoid robots in strength, yet it is safe enough to work side-by-side with humans. It is able to lift, not just hold, this 20-pound weight (about four times heavier than what other dexterous robots can handle) both near and away from its body.

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NASA's ROBONAUT

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What Is Robonaut?

Two Robonaut models hold tools

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Robonaut can use tools designed to be used by astronauts on the space station. Image Credit: NASA

Robonaut is a NASA robot. Engineers designed Robonaut to be humanoid, which means it is built to look like a person. This makes it easier for Robonaut to do the same jobs as a person. Robonaut could help with anything from working on the International Space Station to exploring other worlds. A Robonaut is currently aboard the International Space Station. Continue reading

SPYING FM BUG


simple-fm-transmitter-bug

This video explains another FM Bug, with a higher range of operation.

This FM bug transmitter circuit will let you spy on people. The transmitter can be placed in the desired room and the conversation heard from a place far away just using a regular FM radio set.

The circuit is designed around a single transistor 2N3904 (T1), a custom-made coil (L1), three capacitors (C1 through C3), a trimmer (VC1), two resistors (R1 and R2) and, of course, a condenser microphone (MIC1). The circuit transmits in the frequency range of 88-105 MHz. Transmission range is 100 metres. Continue reading

'TOUCH MAGIX' BRINGS ALIVE ANY SURFACE !

Z12_Interactive-floor-projection-campaign-for-Aircel-launch-in-Gujarat

 

TouchMagix is a combination of hardware and software that makes any projection surface, be it a wall or floor, or even an LCD screen, react to your touch and body gestures

A car game is projected on a wall remote-controlled by human movement. The car runs faster and smoother on collecting ‘Castrol’ fuel packs. Whether you are a gaming freak or not, nearly every passerby would give the game a shot, with many even taking multiple attempts to collect more oil packs to finish first.

At the launch of their new product range, Castrol used this fun and interactive medium, called TouchMagix, to draw and engage crowds of all ages with their brand. TouchMagix, developed by Pune-based startup TouchMagix, makes any projection surface, be it a wall or floor, or even an LCD screen, react to your body gestures or touch.

TouchMagix hardware comprises a high-end PC, a projector and its proprietary TouchMagix sensor. Continue reading

INJECTABLE ELECTRONICS LIGHTS UP A BRAIN

Injectable Electronics Light Up A Brain

Making electronic implants for the body is hard to do: tissue is delicate and stiff components can irritate it. Then there’s getting those implants into the relevant organ without invasive surgery.

To help solve these problems, John A. Rogers, a materials science professor at the University of Illinois, and Michael Bruchas, an anesthesiologist at Washington University in St. Louis, built an electronic LED device so tiny it can be injected into delicate tissue, such as in the brain, without harming it. The experiment appears in this week’s issue of the journal Science.

Rogers told Discovery News that brain tissue is not only fragile, it also tends to move around because brains are suspended in fluid, and that creates problems when one tries to put relatively stiff, rigid electronics or fiber optics in place.

To get around this the researchers put together an extremely small circuit board with Continue reading

40 YEARS OF THE CELL PHONE

Photo by Best DSC!

“Joel, this is Marty Cooper, I’d like you to know that I’m calling you from a cellular phone.” Exactly 40 years ago, on April 3, 1973, Motorola engineer Martin Cooper placed this call — the first ever on a cell phone — to Joel Engel, his rival at AT&T’s Bell Labs.

Cooper, now 85, made history in downtown Manhattan using the bulky prototype he had developed. Continue reading

MAGNET LEVITATES AND THEN MELTS METAL

MAGNET LEVITATES AND THEN MELTS METAL

Click on the Picture to view the video

Cool levitation and heating effects can be done at home — if you happen to have a little specialized electrical equipment and a few tools.

This video shows a piece of metal floating in a coil and then melting. How does this happen? It isn’t magic, just physics.

First the levitation. If you run an alternating current (like the one from the outlets in your house) through coils you generate a magnetic field that changes with time. House current would make it change 50 times per second. (That’s the “50 Hz” you see printed on the power adaptors and appliances when it says what kind of power source you can hook them up to). So the field in that case will oscillate at 50 hertz.

Put something in a magnetic field — like a chunk of aluminum — and the atoms in the object will generate small currents, called eddy currents that generate small magnetic fields of their own. If the material is diamagnetic, which basically means it doesn’t stick to magnets, then the tiny magnetic fields will be opposite to the one in the coil, and generate a force that repels.

This is largely the same principle used in Continue reading

ENERGY HARNESSING : THE PIEZOELECTRIC WAY

ENERGY HARNESSING : THE PIEZOELECTRIC  WAY

Side walks, Foot paths, Dance Clubs, Floors and many other places where more Humans move around a lot. We walk, jump and dance. So why not use all that kinetic energy? Via piezoelectric devices, that’s now possible. Continue reading

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